UP College of Medicine

 

 

THE INSPIRE JOURNEY CONTINUES WITH A STRONGER UPCM-UPMASA PARTNERSHIP

Dean Charlotte Martinez Chiong (UPCM 1985)

UP Medical Sciences Building Update for UPMASA 2022

Dr. Agnes Dominguez-Mejia
Former Dean UP College of Medicine

We are now poised to open UPCM’s new home at the Henry Sy Sr. Hall, a 10,000 square meters Medical Sciences Building built on philanthropy, an edifice which will be home to the country’s future leaders in medicine, where the tradition of honor and excellence will merge with other core values of collaboration, creativity and compassion and where each medical student will be allowed to discover their passion to lead, to serve and to heal. Our administration has raised more than PhP 500M already towards this project with the university’s newly approved PhP 90M to complete the building.

As the only Philippine Medical School accredited by the AUN-QA (Asean Univesity Network- Quality Assurance), another milestone was added when it recently garnered a PAASCU Level 4 accreditation for 5 years in another historical feat by undergoing a virtual inspection last October 14-15, 2021, a first for the agency and UPCM.

The Learning Enhancement in Academic Program (LEAP) at UPCM: Another First!

This new program has been crucial for UPCM to accomplish its mission of delivering the best medical education in the country even during the pandemic.

The first to have face to face classes for the any medical school, UPCM’s LEAP in Anatomy made waves as LU3 students were given the chance to be vaccinated as a group so they could be fully vaccinated by July.  The bridging classes for the first year medical students allowed them to handle their “silent mentors”, experience virtual digital anatomy dissection, and even AR (augmented reality)  enabled lessons. This LEAP has since expanded from the partnership with Harvard Medical School allowing about 40 students to be enrolled in HMX Biochemistry and 180 students enrolled in HMX Pharmacology for the past two years. We are expecting enriched   histology and pathology learning experiences with the recent approval of a grant from CHED and procurement of this vital top of the line remote slide scanner in 2022. We have enrolled more than 540 students in their clinical years LU5-LU7 interns in AMBOSS (with a knowledge library, question bank and clinical modules)  and they have been raving how a big help this learning resource is to them especially in helping them care for patients at PGH. We hope to continue provision of the complimentary subscription in 2022-2023 with the help of donors from UPMASA.  We have lodged several requests at UPMASA’s doors for consideration. The UPCM + which will provide a 20,000 USD seed fund to allow UPCM to create its own modules in Biochemistry and in Pharmacology to replace the HMX modules we are now using in preparing our students in LU3 and LU4 (first year and second year proper students). We are determined to pursue further our digital transformation and upgrade our educational technology equipment but will need digital scanners to gain headway in the quality assurance capacity that came out as survey findings of two successful accreditations by AUN and the more recent PAASCU accreditation. Our Anatomy department led by new chair Dr. Rafael Bundoc has requested plastinated human anatomy models and we will continue to look at augmented reality for teaching anatomy with about 70,000 USD funds infusion required.  One good news is that the remote digital slide scanner that was requested from UPMASA in 2019 has now been approved for funding by CHED at 14M PhP as this is the top model for all slide scanners in the market and will be shared by Histology and Pathology.  Hoping for more  university support to continue providing digital education we have made known our intention to avail of better assessments by acquiring EXAMSOFT (at 88,500 USD per year).

The PANTAWID Student Aid Programme and Beyond

The COVID 19 pandemic was unprecedented and in a resource poor country proved to be even more challenging.  In the initial days since the lockdown our students elected to “volunteer” instead of staying home.  This has been most inspiring to the community and so followed the “Bayanihan Na”, a core Filipino value of helping each other cope especially when faced with difficulties.  The sudden shift to remote learning would have made the already vulnerable students to unequal access to learning opportunities so UPCM. Now on its third call the “Pantawid Program” had distributed more than 150 laptops, financial assistance amounting to PhP 4.6 M as of December 2021.  The more recent challenge has been CHED’s decision to halt the cash grants programme for the newly enrolled students such that those who had to hurdle the dire consequences of the pandemic crisis with diminishing jobs, cost of staying healthy and safe became even more challenging.  About 17 students opted to apply for CHED’s new MSRS (medical scholarship and return service ) programme. About 15 students requested the help of the college and another round of one time cash grant could be provided in the third phase of the Pantawid Programme thanks to the Salanga Fund in UPMASA.  Meanwhile the Office of the Dean has been working hard to solicit more scholarship grants for students. We have been able to have 7 new scholars under the Rotary Club-Ethylene and Ricky Onglao Scholarship and the Tanging Yaman-Evelyn Ang Scholarship this past year. This brings the total number scholarships to 209 from 168 in 2019. We have seen an increase mainly from DOH (14), private (3)  and UPMASA (21).  This totals 22M PhP worth of scholarships that have become available increasing from PhP14M in 2019, a 50 percent increase over a three year period! At present we are working on more scholarships for students with the help of the Philippine Red Cross.

RESEARCH AT ITS BEST

There has been a resurgence of research at UPCM and PGH cornering almost a 609M pesos of research funding for about 217 research projects including student led researches comprising about 10 percent and 64 percent being led by women.  There have been two notable projects that came from UPMASA—the RAMP-UP of the RABOR- Acta Medica Philippina Program with a 100,000 USD support from the Rabor-Santiago families which has supported the country’s national science journal with UPCM at its home and the editor -in-chief Dr Joven Tanchuco who also sits currently as chair of the department of Biochemistry. The journal is now published online monthly and has helped many of our faculty get promoted given that the journal is indexed by SCOPUS. With the grant the digital access, manuscript reviews and processes will be more timely and hopefully AMP will soon realize the goal to be in  Index Medicus for PUBMED access.  The second development thru UPMASA is the successful launch of the Evangeline Olivar-Santos Memorial Award for Best Student Paper with DR. Maria Llaine Callanta and Meritorious Publication in Peer reviewed journals awarded to Dr. Harvey Uy (Ophthalmology) and Dr.  Emmanuel Estrella (Orthopedics). We launched the call for a Postgraduate Studies Grant Program for faculty members embarking on PhD studies and this has received a tremendous response from the Emerald jubilarians the UPCM Class 1967 and the first two of a ten year grant cycle ensured with the cheque turnover of 1MPhP on March 24, 2022.  “Expanding the Edge of Medicine” initiated by Dr. Billy Cabellon and the postgraduate education and fellowship committee members along with then Physician scientists association  at UPCM composed mainly of our MDPhD students have enriched the exchange in research expertise and highlighted the very active cohort of students doing research and reaching more than 100 student led publications last year within the programme.

We have seen a push for more experts to join the “Balik Scientist Programme” which will support a scientist based abroad to engage with the UPCM and we have so far the largest number applied for in recent memory. Once this exchange is well in place we foresee another venue by which research can be made more active in shaping policy and capacity especially with respect to vaccine production. Our involvement in the WHO Solidarity trials for vaccines has shown this institutional strength in research that has gained international recognition thanks to the leadership of Associate Dean for Research  Dr. Marissa Alejandria who herself is an infectious disease expert.

Enhancing Faculty and Administration Staff Development and Recognition

A strong sense of community has never been more nurtured.  In Dean Chiong’s term the Faculty Association became very active in fostering an “esprit de corp” by hosting Faculty Welcome Ceremonies where new faculty are introduced to the community, recognition ceremonies for faculty and administration staff hosted online for the first time on April 2021 and the recognition of Faculty Achievers and Leaders last December 7, 2021.  There have been two professorial chair lecture series already conducted giving an opportunity for faculty to share their life’s work and passion with the whole community of scholars at the college. We were greatly inspired by the achievement of Stephanie Faye Cagayan from the Department of Pharmacology, UP Manila’s first graduate from the PhD by Research and Dr. Ronald Dominic Jamora who was the first graduate from the PhD by Publication.  In the works is a PUSH ONE UP with the goal of providing 100,000 USD funding from UPCM Class 1967 led  by Dr Ted Santiago.  Locally based members of the class led by Dr. Rhoti Torres and newly appointed UP Regent Dr. Greg Pastorfide joined Chancellor  Padilla, the Dean, Associate Dean  for faculty and Students Chette Gonzales, PGIM Director Tech Cruz and June Dumlao as well as External Linkages Asst Dean Angela Aguilar for the turnover of the first cheque of 1M PhP during the MOA signing. This fund will help the faculty of the college continues to lead in efforts to embark on pursuing higher doctorate degrees  despite their very busy clinical and research activities and on top of their teaching duties. We have supported faculty in pursuing masteral degrees for patient safety at Johns Hopkins University, leadership Training with Harvard University among others.

FORGING PARTNERSHIPS HAS NEVER BEEN AS CRUCIAL

The college continues to gain new ground by actively collaborating with many institutions that share its passion for excellence and service. The foremost is within the university with PGH where it gave more than 10,000 testing kits and the NIH an equal number that also allowed the Philippine Genome Center to use those for ensuring safety of students who were stranded in their dormitories and had to be tested prior to being allowed travel back to their communities. Those A*STAR Fortitude Kits were donated by Monde Nissin to the college and augmented by the TOWNS- UP Medical Foundation Partnership such that we were able to upgrade two laboratories,  the MRL ( Medical Research Lab ) in PGH  and the Molecular Lab  at NIH to be accredited molecular labs to handle SarsCov2 testing. We even provided automated PCR machines thru our donors to shorten turnover times significantly. Meanwhile we are preparing to have the best clinical simulation center in the country and have been in talks with potential partners including STRATUS at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the University of Adelaide while we relentlessly pursue the Congress approved funding of well over 200M pesos for faculty items and simulation equipment which we feel will propel our college into a new era of providing the best technology assisted medical education in the country.  We have partnered with Harvard Medical School, PANOPTO, AMBOSS for their learning platforms for the benefits of all our medical students and faculty. This will be  a   burgeoning era of being the country’s lead in SMART ( Strategic  Medicine Accelerated Roadmap for Tomorrow ) program  where quality medical education translates to better healthcare for all Filipinos and UPCM’s core vision is realized  with “leadership in community medical education dedicated to the underserved and uses the primary care approach”.

It is clear that the close relationship of UPCM with UPMASA in the past three years has been most rewarding for UPCM.   Notwithstanding UPCM’s being the top performing school as seen in the  PLE ( physician’s licensure examinations ) passing rate and its students topping consistently the board exams, its leadership will be more meaningful if it is able to help the country progress  with its “Doktor sa Bayan Law “  or RA 11509  where state universities are able to provide medical education to deserving students who would like to serve their communities in a new era of universal healthcare in the country as provided for in RA 11223. “No Filipino shall ever be deprived of healthcare needed”. Health for all Filipinos and Ladymed’s Triumph of science over death” shall be ever enduring aspirational goals for a sustainable future in our beloved country.

Represented by ACCRA, we won our dispute in Construction Industry Arbitration Commission (CIAC) on January 31, 2018 and agreed to a settlement with the insurance company on August 23, 2018. Our gloom started to shift to optimism when we held our groundbreaking at the new site on October 22, 2018 with UP Officials, L&A Architects, DMCI and Constech. But the battle is not yet won. As promised, Dr Rody Sy and I vowed to steward the completion of the Medical Sciences Building (MSB) beyond our retirement.

After 7 years from the time we conceptualized this project and 4 years from the ground breaking, our mood is now one of thanksgiving in behalf of the UPCM and UPMAF benefactors and friends. In spite of the delays brought about by the pandemic and logistics, the MSB, now renamed Henry Sy Sr Hall will finally rise to the heavens as a fully furnished 11-storey top-class learning and working facility for the UP College of Medicine.

A soft opening is scheduled on July 15, 2022 before the opening of classes and the grand opening on October or November, 2022 with the donors in attendance.

Architectural Designs of UP College of Medicine

 
Some Progress Photos as of April 08, 2022
D. M. Consunji Inc.  Engineers/Contractors

 

  UPCM Classes

 

 

UPCM Class of 1967: The 2022 Emerald Jubilarians

 
Push One U.P. :  CLASS 1967’s Emerald Gift to UPCM
By Teodoro V. Santiago, Jr. UPCM 1967

 

UPCM Class 1967, this year’s Emerald Jubilarians are shown with former UPCM Dean Dr. Agnes Mejia, after being honored as UPMAS Class of the Year on December 21, 2017. Continuing the class’s track record of serving and helping UP and PGH, a class member, Dr. Gregorio Pastorfide (8th from the right, 3rd row), was appointed to the UP Board of Regents in 2022.

 

As 2022 approached, Class 1967 pondered whether to have a final bequest to UPCM to mark its Emerald anniversary. It voted to do so in May 2021. Choosing from a few projects, the class finally settled on helping the UPCM Postgraduate Program. The idea for this project came from a message sent by UPCM Dean Charlotte Chiong on 7/18/2021 to two class 67 members who were recent donors to the Acta Medica Philippina. In it, she expressed a wish that she could also have some funds to recruit and prepare deserving faculty to embark on a PhD journey. The decline in faculty members holding PhD degrees at the University of the Philippines has been a concern for some time. In 2011, then UP President Alfredo Pascual sent his vice president Dr. Gisela Concepcion to the USA to appeal to UP alumni abroad for financial help in increasing the number of PhDs in the university faculty. In years past, about 30 percent of the faculty held advanced degrees; these had diminished in 2011 to less than 10 percent.  In one of her stops, Dr. Concepcion was hosted by the UPMASA Baltimore-Washington Chapter on 11/3/2011 where she was quoted as saying that UP had slid in rankings from #62 to #342 and that in Asia, universities in Singapore, Japan, India, China, Taiwan and even Thailand had overtaken UP in worldwide rankings. The primary factors involved in these rankings included the number of PhDs in the faculty, and the number of research grants, publications, and citations of those publications.

Dean Chiong’s letter was circulated to Class 1967 and the class voted to support her appeal. We planned a total outlay of $100,000 ($10,000 per year for a total of 10 years). The primary goal was to financially help junior faculty members at UPCM aspiring for a PhD degree and once attained, providing them with seed money for a research grant. Half of this amount i.e., $5,000 per year was to come from the annual earnings of Class 67’s UPMASA PEF. For the remaining amount, voluntary contributions were solicited from within the class, aiming for a total of $50,000. Within days of the announcement, the Class 67 Philippine-based group jumpstarted the collection with a donation of P1 million. With donations in the USA continuing until July 2022, the fund has already exceeded its original $50,000 goal. On March 25, 2022, the Philippine-based classmates turned over a check for P1 million to UPCM that got the project underway, and funded for its first two years.

This emerald gift to UPCM nicely complements an earlier donation of $110,000 by two class members to the Acta Medica Philippina. The UPCM medical journal had been financially struggling to publish 6 times a year and had a greater than 6 months backlog in publishing accepted papers. Since the donation, the Acta has gone to a twice per month publication and according to SCImago Journal Watch, citations of its papers have significantly increased. Between these two initiatives, Class 67’s expectation (and hope) is for U.P. to continue to deliver a first rate educational experience to her students while strengthening a culture of scientific investigation and increasing the number of research grants.

When the class graduated from UPCM in May 1967, the college was clearly the best in Asia. Only two schools for the purpose of licensure were then considered by New York State as being equivalent to an American or Canadian medical school: UPCM and the American University of Beirut. As reported in JAMA’s annual licensure issues in the 1970’s, UPCM was the best foreign medical school in terms of licensure passing statistics in the USA. In giving this donation, Class 67 clearly believes that there is no reason that this past international reputation cannot be reclaimed. That aim is evident in the name of our project: Push One UP.  It calls on the spirit of the U.P. fight song (Push On U.P.) to reclaim that number one spot. Alternately, it also conveys our vision of pushing UPCM faculty up, one teacher at a time!

 

UPCM Class of 1972A: The 2022 Golden Jubilarians

 

EPILOGUE

From the Summer of ‘72 emerged 96 beings -each one a carrier of cosmic germ and what Dean Herrera aptly called his pietras serenas. From undefined marble pieces, 96 beings molded into Renaissance masterpieces.

From the innocence of the 50’s and ushered into the turbulence of the 60’s thru the 70’s, Class 72A has been through it all, searching for the eternal truths and for the meaning of self and one’s relationship with the universe. In medical school, the seemingly endless series of lectures and didactics took on profound meaning when faced with realities of death, suffering, hunger and poverty in our clinical years. We have become tempered steel before them.

Today, let us part the curtains of time fifty years hence and discover the savage shock of the future that we thought would never come but is now staring back at us. It is time for reflection and gratitude for the hard-earned accomplishments of what we have become and also a time for acceptance of what we cannot change or even dared to dream. Let us embrace our frailties as we step into our golden years and rejoice as we are ushered into a new chapter of unmeasured time for self fulfillment and discovery and finding meaning and purpose to it all.

Indeed, in many ways, we have become the pietras serenas of today.

 

UPCM Class of 1972B: The 2022 Golden Jubilarians

UP CLASS 72B GOLDEN JUBILARIANS
Vivien C. Abad MD MBA

 

Congratulations to Class 72B members! We celebrate our triumphs, refresh our memories, and remember our friends who are no longer among us. We entered the halls of UPCM in 1968 expecting to graduate in 1973. Republic Act No. 5946 amended the Medical Act of 1959, making our class the pioneers of the 4-year curriculum for UP College of Medicine. Since there were 2 graduating classes in 1972, the standard 5-year curriculum was designated as 1972A and our class became 1972B.

We broke the glass ceiling of women in medicine. Out of 88 class members, 49 (56%) were women and 39 (44%) were men. Sadly, 15 (17%) of our class members are deceased. We won the caroling contest every Christmas for 4 years because we had good singers, a superb coach (Justice Magdangal de Leon), and salabat to keep the singers from getting chilled.

In our 2nd year, many women from our class founded the Phi Lambda Delta Sorority, a sister sorority of Phi Kappa Mu. The sorority remains active and growing, a legacy from our class.

Academic excellence was always emphasized: our class valedictorian, Renato Mascardo, topped the scores in the Physician Licensure Examination and Eugenio Banez, Eugenio Amparo, Blesilda Mario Singh, and Hector Bacaling were in the top 10. Following graduation, more than 50% of the class relocated to the United States, but a significant number remained. In both the Philippines and overseas, Class 72B participants have pursued other degrees (MPH, MPA, JD, MBA, PhD). They assumed positions of leadership either as faculty members, dean/associate dean, PGH directors, leaders in medical staff administration (chief of staff, department chairs, medical directors) and have engaged in research and published articles in peer-reviewed journals, written book chapters, presented at national/international meetings, engaged in community service, military service, and good works. Class members have sponsored medical missions to underserved areas in the Philippines and have donated to UPCM and PGH.

Not just academia flourished with our class. We have talented singer/musicians, painters, social dancers, travelers, golfers, a marathon and 10 K runner, and eclipse chasers. A classmate, Anet Bernabe Chu, and her husband, Fred Chu, won the national amateur ballroom competition in the USA for 7 years. They did so despite health setbacks. Their triumph reflects resilience, tenacity, and a search for joy and meaning which we all embrace.

 

UPCM Class of 1977: The 2022 Sapphire Jubilarians

 

The Roll Call

by Solita de Jesus- O’Brien with Merlyn Gille-Moore and Elizabeth Regalado-Paterno

 

The odds to beat to be born a human being is supposedly 1 in 400 million. Add to that the odds of being accepted to the University of the Philippines, making the cut at the College of Medicine, graduating, and still be alive and kicking —some more vigorously than others—today. To be present at the roll call on the 45th   (sapphire) anniversary of our graduation is a triumph over extremely unfavorable probability.

Lourdes Inciong Publico, our UPMASA President and classmate has the honor to call the roll for the Class ’77 in the United States, Canada and New Zealand.

Members marked present with an update on current professional status:                          

      Name

Specialty

Status

Aguila-Gonzalez, Virginia

Family Medicine

Retired

Batas, Venerando

Rehabilitation Medicine

Medical Director TGH Rehabilitation Hospital

Besa-Loria, Leilani

Pediatrics

Limited practice

Casono-Stumman, Myrna

Internal Medicine

Retired

Caringal-Miller, Cecilia

Psychiatry

 

Castillo-Ronquillo, Yasmyne

Ophthalmology/Law

Active

Cosico-de Jesus, Corazon

Psychiatry

Retired in Canada

De Jesus, Filemon Jr.

Urology

Retired in Canada

De Jesus-O’Brien, Solita

Business

Retired

Del Carmen-Reyes, Myrna

Internal Medicine

Retired

Dizon-Bumanlag, Jocelyn

Mental Health Counselor

Retired

Edrosa-Medina, Evangeline

Business

Retired

Escober, Wilfredo

Neurology

 

Flores, Eric

Neurosurgery

Retired

Gille-Moore, Merlyn

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Retired

Gonzalez, Luis Alberto

Family Medicine

Retired

Gulmatico, Constantino

General surgery

Active

Ignacio-Cruz, Zenaida

Pediatrics

Active

Juan-Vargas, Socorro

Endocrinology

Limited practice

King, Teresita

Obstetrics-Gynecology

 

Lim, Edward VA

Orthopedic Surgery

Active

Luna-McGee, Evangeline

Nuclear Medicine

Retired

Luzon-Jaucian, Gloria

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Retired

Magtibay-Thompson, Adoracion

Family Medicine

Retired

Mendoza, Gil

Anesthesiology

Limited practice

Milla, Rosalinda Elena

Academics Medicine

Active

Navarro-Tagle, Cyrilda

Pediatrics

Retired

Oyog, Lily

 

 

Padilla-Burgos, Lourdes

Pediatric/Adolescent Medicine/

Active

Paragas-Abad, Merlina

 

 

Peralta, Belinda

Internal Medicine

Retired

Publico, Lourdes

Rehabilitation Medicine

Chief: Rehabilitation Medicine, Harlem Hospital

Quilop, Ma. Teresa

Allergology

Retired

Ramos-de Castro, Dulce

Pathology

Medical Director of Laboratories: San Antonio Regional Hospital

Reyes-Arcangel, Fe

Internal Medicine

Limited practice

Reyes-Landicho, Helen

Primary Care Physician

Retired

Reyes, Jose Luis

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Retired

Soriano, Virgilio

Internal Medicine

Limited practice

Tan, Auriel

 

 

Tiu, Gregory

Radiology

Retired

Urgel-Senatin, Evelyn

Critical Care Nurse

Active

Valenzuela, Diego Jr.

Family Medicine

Retired

Vega-Zarraga, Irene

Internal Medicine

Retired

Yap, Rudyard

Infectious Diseases

In New Zealand

Zarraga, Walfredo

Internal Medicine

Retired

 

Agnes Dominguez-Mejia, erstwhile Dean of the UP College of Medicine, has the honor to call the roll for the class in the Philippines, Taiwan and Singapore

Members marked present as  of April 2022:

      Name

Specialty

Status

Aldea-Salvador, Lourdes

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Active

Aguila-Borromeo, Josephine

Business

Active

Alejo-Pascua, Ma. Corazon

Radiology

 

Almeida-Luna, Imelda

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Retired

Aquino-Baello, Edna

Dermatology

Active

Ayaso-Sapalo, Imelda

Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology; Pediatrics

 

Baello, Ernesto

Cardiology

Active

Barcelon, Ma. Magdalena

Community Medicine

Active

Bitera. Emmanuel

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Active in teaching

Bolinao-Campana, Imelda

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Limited practice

Cabio-Lorenzana, Rosemarie

Pediatrics

Active

Canga-Pineda, Beatrice Corrina

Dermatology

Active

Cantos-David, Teresita

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Active

Castillo-Lim, Praxedes

Obstetrics-Gynecology

Retired

Cheong, Fernando

Pediatrics

Chairman of the Board, Zamboanga Peninsula Medical Center

Chua-Kaw, Caroline

 

 

Chua-Lo, Christine

Pediatrics

Retired

Cosalan, Edwin

Otorhinolaryngology

Medical Director of Notre Dame de Chartres Hospital in Baguio

Cristobal, Fortunato

Pediatrics

Dean, Ateneo de Zamboanga School of Medicine

Cruz, Amante

Epidemiology; Insurance Medicine

Retired

Cueto, Jose Jr.

General Surgery

Commissioner of the Philippine Professional Regulatory Commission

Cukingnan, Alexander

Otorhinolaryngology

Limited practice

Dado-McDonald, Adora

 

 

de Grano, Jose Rene

Obstetrics-Gynecology

President, Private Hospitals Association of the Philippines; President/CEO Lipa Medix Medical Center; Medical Director of San Juan Doctors Hospital

de la Cruz, Rodolfo

Otorhinolaryngology

Limited practice

de la Llana, Leila

General Surgery; Laser Therapy

Active in Laser Therapy

de la Paz-Ignacio, Cynthia

Anesthesiology

Retired

Demeterio, Jercyl

Psychiatry

 

Dominguez-Mejia, Agnes

Nephrology

Active

Espos, Roberto Jr.

Pediatrics

Active

Gatchalian, Eduardo

Urology

Active

Gonzalez-Regala, Fatima

Ophthalmology: Oculoplastic, Cosmetic & Reconstructive Surgery

Active in surgery and teaching at DOH Eye Center East Ave Hospital

Gordo, Nicholas

Hospital Administration, Public Health, Family Medicine

Retired

Gueco, Irmingarda

Nephrology

Active

Jimenez, Margarita

Oncology

Active in Singapore

Kua, Ka Em

Neonatology

Active in Taiwan

Litao, Roumel

Ophthalmology

Limited practice

Ludovice-Yap, Teresa

Microbiology / Immunology / Psychology

Semi-retired; teaches  Traditional Chinese Medicine

Manuel-Gonzales, Maria Gay

Obstetrics-Gynecology; Gyne Oncology

Chief of OB in Brent Hospital; Head of Phil OB-Gyne Society (POGS) Board of Trustees for Mindanao

Mensalvas-Montilla, Teresita  

Pediatrics; Business

Active in Business

Oyog, Lily

General Surgery

 

Regalado-Paterno, Elizabeth

Community Medicine, Pediatrics

Retired

Renales, Ma. Lina

Neurology

Active

Reyes, Leslie

Orthopedic Surgery

Member of the Board of Directors, Los Baños Doctors’ Hospital and Medical Center

Samson, Taciano

General Practice

Retired

Sto. Niño-Dayrit, Elvira

Public Health, Maternal and Child Health; Served at the Dept. of Health

Research consultant; teaches at Subic Medical School

Sumpaico, Madeleine

Pediatrics, Allergology

Active

Tan-Lim, Rosario

Dermatology

Retired

Tecson-Eugenio, Lydia

Pediatrics, Infectious Disease

Limited practice

 

Never Absent in our Memory

In the 40-year span after graduation, we mourned the loss of classmates Balbina (Baby) Landicho, Demetrio (Jun) Fajardo Jr., Yang Kwon Chen, Serafin (Jun) Ariola Jr., Joel Elises, and Ricardo (Dick) Esguerra. In the last five years our hearts were repeatedly broken by the passing of Fernando (Ferdie) Serra Jr., Adelinda (Dodge) Zurbano-Villaruz, and Resurreccion (Cherry) Acosta-Santos.  We grieved over the demise of Honorata (Jane) Giongco-Baylon, hematologist who was vital in kidney transplantation in the Philippines; Salvacion (Sally) Rodriguez- Gatchalian, President of Philippine Pediatric Society when she was struck down by Covid 19, and Maria Lourdes (Loutang) Tangco who was gunned down while in the service of the Filipino masses in the mountains of Luzon. It was a sad day for us when Jacob (Jake) Matubis, otorhinolaryngologist and Anatomy professor at UPCM passed away recently.

Looking Forward

 Five years from now, those of us who have come this far hope to beat even greater odds by being all present for our Golden Anniversary.

 

 

UPCM Class of 1987

 
Rooted in Faith, Transformed in Service:  The Journey from 1987

 

This year, 2022, we found each other again, 35 years after we set our dreams.   We recognize that our sense of connection today is stronger than ever.  Connection is what fuels our passion for SERVICE – to be part of a greater mission in the community, wherever we may be.  Every single one of us found our own path – research, academe, administration, clinical practice, medical mission, homemakers, and more. But in every road taken, we have found our purpose.

Deeply rooted in our calling was our love to help other people – to BE the change, and to make a DIFFERENCE individually. But we discovered we created a bigger impact when we worked together as Class 87.    Our class embodies the African UBUNTU principle of TOGETHERNESS — “I am, because you are.”.  Our collective actions have an impact on others, and on society.  Our work through our relationships defines who we are as a class; we call it “Tatak ’87”.  We give meaning to what the late Archbishop Desmond Tutu has said – “When you do well, it spreads out, it is for the whole of humanity.”

The Ubuntu of our class is our BAYANIHAN spirit.  It begins with ONE person, then others follow. One vision.  Our roots are deep in faith in fighting for the greater good of our Filipino society.  We believe that everyone can help AND we recognize people for what they bring.  We are who we are today because of our class.  It has defined our mark in our society, and in the whole world, wherever we may be.

 

​UPCM Class of 1992: The 2022 Pearl Jubilarians

 
UPCM: Mother-of-Pearl
Class 1992 Pearl Jubilarians
By Michael S. Nolledo, MD UPCM ‘92

 

UPCM Class 1992 turned twenty-five in the year global politics changed. President Trump internationally and President Duterte locally shifted how power was wielded and democracy was defined. Falsehoods were labeled truths and facts were called fake news. And through these we held the line and thrived. Now five years later we are dealing with the deaths and economic hardships wrought by Covid and are lachrymose at how the dulcet tones of global peace have been replaced by the drumbeat of war. But our class has always risen to the challenge of the times. In this, our pearlescent year, we will do what we have always done – Serve, Live and Prepare for what is to come.

Ministrare

The class was the tip of the spear in the Philippine Covid pandemic response. Eric in his post as FDA Director General expedited the approval of highly efficacious vaccines and antiviral medications. Anna, JJ, Jubert, Ants, Tony, Ces, Albert, Gar and others helped formulate and implement National Covid policy and played key roles in transforming PGH into the primary Covid referral hospital. Aileen in her position as MSD Asia-Pacific Head of Medical Affairs helped bring the drug Molnupiravir to the country.

And beyond the pandemic other class members stood out. Cay completed stints as CEO of Makati Medical Center and Cardinal Santos Medical Center. Lucky is the Director of the UC Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center. Helen is the Medical Director of the Adult Liver Transplantation Program of the University of Chicago. Pip served as UP faculty regent and is presently Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs of UP Visayas. Ron is Associate Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School and a leader in digital healthcare research. Nicky is the CEO of MediCard Philippines. Melfie is Dean of UP-NTTCHP. JJ, Tech and Ants are part of the UPCM Dean’s management team. Dodo served as CEO of Philhealth and is now an ADB executive and universal healthcare champion.

The rest of us worked in hospitals and clinics, in small towns and large metropolises to heal the sick, comfort the suffering, and drive out the demons that make society ill.

Vivere

The class members also lead engaging lives outside of work. Fred has written thousands of movie and TV show reviews. Rod writes about medical history and has published a book on the subject. Mike is one of the founders of pinoyexchange.com and has an extensive collection of vintage omega watches. Toti is an aspiring gunsmith and sniper. Hans is a partner at the Romulo Law Office – the only surgeon in the place. Joy celebrates our birthdays with fresh faced digital avatars. Mayos led the class in donating the solar power unit of the new Medical Sciences building. The rest of the class is full of accomplished cooks, bakers, photographers, runners, singers, quilters, travelers, and KDrama/KPop enthusiasts. For us professional excellence and joie de vivre are bedfellows.

Praeparare

Tech and JJ begat Jose Joachim. Ants begat Micaela. Jet begat Jose Manuel Ricardo. Cyn begat Zimri, Cyrene and Zuriel. Maybelle and Hans begat Maria Bettina. May begat Lorenzo Miguel. Natzie begat Nathan. Irene begat Rafael Jose. Cathy begat Gabriella.

These young women and men so perfectly connected to us are UPCM graduates and students who will be our ambassadors. They will carry our skills and sentiments and become more noteworthy versions of us. And those afflicted with disease will be the healthier for it.

When dragons fight amongst the clouds, pearls fall from the sky.

Ancient Chinese myth

In this season of trial in the thirtieth year since our birth we continue to proudly represent our alma mater. We render exemplary service as physician leaders and physician scientists to those in need. We are clever and resourceful in applying our God-given talents. And we are confident that in later days our posterity will take pride in what we have accomplished.

​UPCM Class of 1997: The 2022 Silver Jubilarians

 
Silver Jubilarians: UPCM Class 1997
By Francesca Tatad To, MD

 

In 1992, amidst rolling brownouts and social unrest, 160 young, hopeful, and eager individuals were admitted to the hallowed halls of the UP College of Medicine. We dissected cadavers by the fading glow of rechargeable lamps and took Gross Anatomy exams at the crack of dawn to make the most of the daylight.

On Day 1, we were told that we were a very impressive class on paper (the term “record-breaking” may have been used) and that great things were expected of us. Those expectations were quickly shattered. TRP was never won, and event and raffle tickets remained unsold. The class motto was “friendship and unity” yet not once did we all agree on anything – not on a prescribed uniform, not even on the necessity of celebrating birthdays. The matter of a missing Oil Immersion Objective did nothing to help our notoriety. And yet, in that time together, Medicine was learned well, strong bonds of friendship were formed, and the primary tasks given by our alma mater – to heal and to serve – were very much taken to heart.

Following our graduation in the summer of 1997, an overwhelming majority of us stayed in the Philippines. We filled up residency programs, took on government jobs, worked with private entities, explored non-traditional career paths. A small number left to pursue further training on foreign shores.

In 2022, twenty-five years after being released into the wild, members of our class can be found leading professional and regulatory boards, major medical societies (across various specialties and subspecialties), hospitals, and clinical departments in the Philippines and in other parts of the world. Some are involved in government health programs, spearheading vital public health initiatives like organ donation and Unang Yakap. Some are in academe doing groundbreaking research. Some have devoted themselves to transforming the face of medical education. Those who have chosen to live quieter lives or taken alternate paths are no less passionate in their pursuit of excellence.

As we celebrate the time when our lives first intersected and the place where many of our beliefs and ideals were shaped, we would like to think we have met and exceeded all original expectations. More importantly, we are more united now than ever before. As a class, we remain fully committed to the promise we made at graduation – to heal and to serve our fellow humans, our community, our nation, our world; and to pave the way for future generations to do the same.

Photo Collage by: Ian Gampon, MD

​UPCM Class of 2002

 
UPCM 2002 at 20 years
By Vivien Yap, MD

 

The UP College of Medicine Class of 2002 celebrates two decades since medical school graduation this year. A quarter century has passed since we started out wide-eyed in the lecture halls of BSLR, toiling away to learn anatomy, physiology, among others, cockily declaring on a t-shirt: “I have forgotten more things than you will ever know”, and optimistically (perhaps naively) singing “we’re gonna be cool doctors someday” in our class TRP (Tao Rin Pala) song.

That ‘someday’ has now come, with many in this talented class leading the way in many fields of medicine across the world, including during the pandemic, and have indeed become the cool doctors they aspired to be.

The UP College of Medicine trains bright young minds with rigor and discipline, with the expectation to be the best physicians they could be, and instills in them the empathy and social awareness to do their best for others.

Medical school for UPCM Class 2002 was bookended by global events of Princess Diana’s death in 1997 and an intern year when the world changed with the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. A class full of optimism saw the peaceful transition from President Ramos to Estrada, and were in the streets of Manila for the Second EDSA Revolution wearing their med-school whites to protest the corruption that stole from the very people who we were learning the wonders of medicine from.

Since graduation, many have journeyed across the world to further train and practice medicine while enhancing the communities they settled in. The pandemic occurred in mid-career for this class, where they are leading and learning, along with the rest of the world, protected by their age relative to their senior colleagues while experienced enough to create solutions where there are none yet known.

We are proud of the best among us, such as TOYM awardees Dr. Ryan Guinaran, passionate health advocate for indigenous people, and retina scientist Dr. Paolo Silva; and those gone too soon, Dr. Kathy Lipana who brought elegance and laughter to any room, and Dr. Rommel Ancheta, who returned to care for his community as MHO.

This year, UPCM 2002 reflects on our medical school roots, the challenges and excellence of the rigorous training, the best of friends we made, the optimism and hope for being the best and coolest of physicians.

 

 

 

​UPCM Class of 2012

The Coming of Age of a UPCM Class: 2012 in 2022
Nicolo L. Cabrera, MD

 

The years that have passed since our graduation are now twice as many as those we spent in medical school. The journey began with an entire class moving as one, slogging through the same lectures and exams. Ten years ago that journey split into 159 different paths, taking us to different corners of the country and even the world.

Many of us have completed or are about to complete clinical training—though there are a few with the vigor to reenter or restart training in pursuit of opportunity. Many bravely left the beaten track—off to become a health law expert and advocate, a health economist, a pharmacogenomic epidemiologist, among others. Many are spouses and parents. All of us neither young nor old, neither at the starting point nor at the finish line. We’ve turned the corner, now with our own advice to dispense and our own students and trainees to guide and mentor.

But we’ve also only just begun. We still have practices to grow, scholarship to undertake, communities to build, institutions to revamp, guidelines to reshape, small kids to raise and nephews and nieces to dote on. Plenty to do before our own silver jubilee.

To win our second TRP we sang Raphy’s lyrics, “Sana laging ganito pa rin, kahit na ilang bagyong dumating. And indeed the storms came—both literal and metaphorical ones that upended social, political and public life. These were storms that pulled us together and pulled us apart. They made us ask ourselves how we pick up the pieces, how we move forward and how we fit together again. We don’t know the answers yet.

But we do know there’s a Facebook group chat.

Our paths have diverged, but they have also ensured we are each well-placed to lend a helping hand and the chat group is a place to find each other. A request for a resource, a guideline, a referral, an introduction, a bit of inside information will hardly ever go unanswered. Whatever our differences, disagreements and distances, hopefully there will always be a class full of people at our back. Sana laging ganito.